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This isn't a challenge. This is not another thing to do or something to check off, this are ideas to help rethink waste and the resources that keep us and our planet going each day. Not everyone has access to the same things and we have to be mindful of the complexities that exist in the world - social, political, and of course environmental.  There is no one-way and no perfect. 

Let's have a conversation. 

Immediate resources: 

Learn the mindset: Circular Mindset Guide

Check out our How To Make Less Trash Guide

New Ideas Will be Introduced Each Week!

 

1. Slowly switch away from single-Use disposables 

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Before the 1950's emerged, the idea of buying something with your hard earned money, using it once, tossing it, all to go out and rebuy again and again was considered a waste of money and time. Also, there  wasn't any disposable products on that level to the masses to buy anyway. If you bought something, it was designed to last, to be repaired or mended.

While we haven't in human civilization lived in a circular (zero waste) infrastructure, we did for the most part have a bit more value in what we made and how we used items then we do today. 

Disposables were introduced in the mid 1950's and were sold as a convenience product, a way to free-up our time, and a sneaky way for you to keep repurchasing an item from a company. They photo on the left is an actual article in the 1955 issue of Life Magazine. 

If we really think about what we spend (including the time and travel to get to a place to purchase) on disposables time after time, we'd really see that we not saving time or money. 

Many of the ideas we're sharing are methods humans used before disposables. They are not "new", they were apart of many indigenous cultures and people of color for generations. 

Embrace: Resourcefulness. Thriftiness. 

Ideas:

Use old t-shirts, towels, or sheets and cut them into even squares to use in replace of disposable tissues, paper towels, and for wiping up messes. The amount of energy it takes to extract, manufacture, ship, and dispose is more than what it takes to wash the reusable when we are done with it. 

Reuse old pasta, pickle, or other condiment glass jars for storing leftover, for bringing your drinks with you, or for taking your lunches or leftovers home with you.